Famous Hari Raya Local Dishes From Each State in Malaysia

There’s nothing in this world like the food you will find in Malaysia during Hari Raya. Don’t get me wrong, we have amazing food all year round and for special occasions, but the delicacies served during Hari Raya are at the top of most of our tourists’ “must-have” lists.

Hari Raya marks the end of Ramadhan, or the fasting month, for Muslims worldwide, and especially here in Malaysia. So what follows a month of fasting? A whole month of celebrations and eating amazing dishes, many of which can only be found this time of the year. But you don’t have to be Muslim to enjoy them and experience everything that Hari Raya has to offer.

Introduced by foreign and local settlers many years ago, Malay heritage food is a delicious symbol of the colorful Malaysian Muslim lifestyle and has rightfully claimed its place of cultural significance during the festive season. And what better occasion than Hari Raya to take your diners on a trip back to yesteryear with a mouth-watering array of heritage delicacies from famous local places in Malaysia.

Kuantan: Puding Raja

This particular pudding was a specialty from the region of Pekan, Pahang. Puding Raja (“Royal Pudding”) is a traditional Pahang Malay dish taken as an appetizer or dessert and is easy to make at home especially when it comes to Hari Raya Aidilfitri.

You don’t need to be royalty to feast like a king, because treats like Puding DiRaja (Royal Pudding), once reserved for royal banquets, are increasingly available to the public. Puding Raja is not so much a pudding as a simple dish of bananas with a sauce or gravy made from milk and cornflour. Its palate sweetness is balanced with hints of tartness from prune, and there’s myriad textures – spongy, chewy, crispy, and smooth – in every bite.

Ipoh: Rendang Tok

Unlike many other rendang varieties where the chunks of beef are stewed in a rich and spicy sauce known as “kuah“, Rendang Tok from Perak is much drier in comparison, with the gravy being greatly reduced from prolonged simmering until all that’s left is merely a thick layer that coats and adheres onto each piece of meat. Because of this, every chunk of beef is packed with so much flavor as the spices and condiments used become concentrated and compacted from the sauce reduction.

Rendang Tok has always been a famous dish during the Hari Raya Aidilfitri here.

Rendang cooking has a long withstanding tradition in Malaysia and has since evolved and developed so many varieties, with almost every state having its own unique variation. So it comes as no surprise that Perak too has its own “special” rendang and rightfully so as it is very famous, enjoyed by not only the Perakians but also visitors to the state. “Rendang Tok” as it is known, with “Tok” to mean royalty, this delicious rendang is literally food befitting the kings!

Sabah & Sarawak: Kelupis

If you’re planned to travel Sarawak for Hari Raya Aidilfitri, Kelupis is a must-try. It is a traditional snack of both the Bisaya people and the Bruneian Malay people residing in Brunei and the Malaysian states of Sabah and Sarawak. Glutinous rice is first cooked in coconut milk that is flavored with pandan leaves, then wrapped in daun nyirik leaves.

The prepared rolls are steamed, then left to hang so they contain no excess water and the rice inside is not wet or damp. Once unwrapped, this snack is delicious enough to be eaten alone, but it’s typically paired with curry or a spicy meat dish known as rendang.

Pulau Pinang: Halwa Maskat

Most common local delicacies in Pulau Pinang is Halwa maskat which is a traditional sweet dish served only on Hari Raya Aidilfitri. It is a very special dish for Penang.

Halwa maskat is a kind of rectangular shaped candy like jelly made from beef, flour, and sugar. 

The secret to producing high quality Halwa masks is not only dependent on the right ingredients, but also on the complicated and time-consuming methods of preparation and the process of mixing the batter continuously.

The dough to produce Halwa masks should be refrigerated for three days and three nights before being stirred on a slow burn for five hours non-stop. If not, the mixture may be crusty and warm.

Johor: Lontong

One of the top dishes during Hari Raya Aidilfitri in Johor Bahru is Lontong. It is a combination of nasi impit, vegetables and meat, served together with a savoury coconut milk base. Lontong can be eaten as a full meal since it has everything included in it.

Lontong is typically eaten as a breakfast dish and also served during special occasions such as Hari Raya Aidilfitri and Malay weddings.

Depending on the region it’s prepared in, there are several variations. Some cooks include peanuts in the gravy while others add tempeh or a hard-boiled egg. The bright orange coconut soup is usually served separately from the ingredients to avoid softening the rice cakes.

Terengganu & Kelantan: Nasi Dagang

Ask locals in Kelantan & Terengganu what their local main dish is and don’t be surprised if all say “Nasi Dagang!”.

This flavorful Malaysian dish consists of rice that is steamed in coconut milk and usually served accompanied by spicy fish curry. It is traditionally associated with eastern parts of the country, primarily the regions of Kelantan and Terengganu, along with Southern Thailand.

Depending on the area, nasi dagang can be prepared with husked red rice or the combination of jasmine and glutinous white rice. It is enjoyed as a hearty breakfast that comes served doused in flavor-packed fish curry, and it is usually complemented by pickled vegetables, hard-boiled eggs, toasted coconut, sambal, and fish crackers.

Negeri Sembilan: Rendang Hitam

There is a dish that will never absence from the celebrations of Hari Raya, no matter whose house you go, you will never miss this dish.

Yup, it’s Rendang!

In fact, it’s not just for Hari Raya. In Malay society, whenever there is a gathering, the serving of Rendang is a must.

An all-time favorite for the festive table, rendang is often prepared with either beef or chicken infused with aromatic spices and coconut milk for hours. Many culinary experts around the world like to refer to rendang as a curry because of the way it’s slowly stewed on low heat and the array of spices, but it’s richer than a curry and has less sauce, so many Malaysians don’t consider it a curry.

Interestingly, rendang contains natural preservatives due to its recipe which calls for a unique fusion of ground spices and coconut milk, which gives the dish a shelf life up to four weeks.

Malacca: Dodol

Malacca’s local famous dish during Hari Raya Aidilfitri is Dodol. While the base ingredients to make this sweet Hari Raya dessert – coconut milk, cane sugar, and rice flour – appear unassuming enough, in truth, this is one of the most challenging recipes on this list. The cooking process involves continuously stirring the sticky mixture in a hot wok for nine hours. Then it is rolled, portioned out, and individually wrapped.

All this effort does pay off beautifully at the end when you bite into an incredibly rich and flavourful dessert that’s as popular with adults as it is with children. Doldol can also be found in durian, soursop, apple, jackfruit, and milk flavours.

Kedah: Lengat Pisang

Lengat Pisang is a rare type of dessert and only a few know it. Its name is given because it is steamed.

It is an iconic traditional food that is a must-have at Hari Raya Aidilfitri in Kedah.

Selangor: Satay

There’s satay … and then there’s satay Kajang. Brought into the country by the West Javanese towards the end of World War I, the skewered meat is found in abundance at this town in Selangor today. Satay Kajang has gained a reputation for being perfectly tender and flavourful.

What separates Kajang’s satay from the West Javanese one is the chunks of grilled fat. Chicken and beef are the most common variant, but there are other more “exotic” offerings too like rabbit, venison, and duck, as well as liver and gizzard.

Perlis: Kurma Daging

Perlis, the smallest state in Peninsular Malaysia, abuts the Thai border. The state capital of Kangar is surrounded by limestone hills. In this region during Hari Raya Aidilfitri, curry dishes cooked with lots of coconut milk – like Gulai Daging and Kurma Daging Perlis are all-time favorites.

This dish is usually served with ketupats(glutinuous rice).

Negeri Sembilan: Masak lemak cili api

Deliciously rich and spicy, this dish is a fine representation of the masak lemak cooking style. The Minang cooking method – which usually includes turmeric with creamy coconut milk – is particularly popular during Hari Raya Aidilfitri in Negeri Sembilan.

The locals here love a good serving of heat, and masak lemak cili api delivers that through the usage of copious amounts of spicy chilli. The creamy gravy is usually served with meat, seafood and vegetables.

Take Hari Raya to a whole new level with family trips to Malaysia. Malaysia is a big nation, thus you will have ample time to explore the best areas during the Hari Raya holidays.

What better way to witness how different cultures celebrate this religious celebration than being there when it happens? This Raya holiday, how about going on a Malaysian food trip with your nose (and stomach!) as your guide? We’ve tracked down some signature dishes from the many states in Malaysia to start you off.

Discovering Famous Local Food Spot As You Travel

Continuing the series on unmissable dishes in popular destinations, do you remember your favourite food in your favourite travel spot, do you missed them??? We’ll show you something that will make your stomach hungry mouth moving hand itching on the spot now!!!

Naples: Deep Dish Pizza

Neapolitan pizza, or pizza Napoletana, is a type of pizza that originated in Naples, Italy. This style of pizza is prepared with simple and fresh ingredients: a basic dough, raw tomatoes, fresh mozzarella cheese, fresh basil, and olive oil. No fancy toppings are allowed!

Seoul, Korea: Bulgogi (marinated beef barbecue)

Known for being one of the top Korean BBQ restaurants in Seoul, Maple Tree House is also one of the best places to try bulgogi.

A juicy, savory dish of grilled marinated beef, bulgogi is one of the most popular Korean meat dishes throughout the world

Best Swedish meatballs in Stockholm

“The city’s first meatball boutique” serves up 14 different varieties of organic meatballs, ranging from rooster, to moose, ox, wild boar, pig, salmon, reindeer, turkey and vegetable.

Swedish meatballs with all natural ingredients and serve with creamy dreamy swedish sauce. So tempting!

Lisbon, Portugal: Churros

Guilty by Olivier retaurant has some of the best churros in Lisbon!

Churros are a popular snack made from fried dough pastry, cut into sausage shapes and doused in sugar. Dipping them in hot melted chocolate is pretty much the law.

Berlin, Germany: Pfannkuchen

Soft, ooey-gooey modern vegan versions of this classic can be found in one of the best pfannkuchen in Germany which is at Backerei & Konditrei.

Sweet fried dough is filled with plum butter or strawberry, raspberry or cherry jam and covered in icing sugar or an icing glaze.

Shaanxi: Biang Biang Mian

These treats include egg, meat, tomato, small diced potato and much more. The noodles are the layer below this and they sit in a little pool of oily sauce.

Mix it all together and you get a wonderful mixture of flavours that send your taste buds wild.

You also have the option to spice it up, if you so wish.

Chang’An Taste in Hung Hom, Hong Kong has served this iconic delicacy since 2016.

Le Volant Basque, Rue Beatrix Dussane: Creme Brulee

This small restaurant is a short walk away from the Eiffel Tower and serves a delightful creme brulee. The golden brown top is light and crispy, with a perfectly set custard underneath – easily the best you’ll find near the Champ de Mars!

County Down, Northern Ireland: Sunday Roast

Sunday Roast is the jewel in the crown of this restaurant.

The roast is typically comprising of different roasted meats like chicken breast, turkey, pork and beef. Served with various seasonal vegetables, roasts potatoes and gravy. The Sunday roast is absolutely filling.

Cheese fondue in Swiss Chuchi, Zurich

Swiss Chuchi is a well-known eatery in Zurich that specializes in traditional Swiss style food.

This is a pot of melted cheese, wine and garlic, served on open flame and people dip their bread pieces with long forks and eat it. Serving fondue with hot steaming cup of tea makes a wholesome cold weather meal.

Kumpir in Patatos, Istanbul Turkey

In Istanbul, there is this popular street food called kumpir or loosely translated “maxed out baked potato”.

Made of jacket potato with a crisp outer skin and soft inside, it is available with a variety of toppings to choose among– cheese, sausage, pickles, and Russian salad. 

Favourite Nasi Lemak Kampung Baru Kuala Lumpur

One of the best and must try food in Malaysia is ………… Nasi Lemak!

The “nasi lemak” (rice infused with coconut milk) is light and fluffy and the sambal is flavourful and slightly sweet, but the star on the plate is without a doubt, the chicken. The chicken is marinated with a host of spices and then deep fried to perfection with a crispy skin and moist, juicy flesh. 

So when this COVID-19 outbreaks over, travel to the place you’ve always wanted to see, eat the foods you’ve always wanted to try or miss.

But overall, this, like everything else, will not last forever. We will all get through this together and we will come back stronger than we were before.

In this moment, always remember; We’ve got this!

Hang in there everyone!

What to Do in Putrajaya: Explore Traditional Malay Food in Night Market

Putrajaya is Malaysia’s latest Federal Territory. Putrajaya takes over the administrative functions of the capital city Kuala Lumpur and is part of the Multimedia Super Corridor project of the Malaysian government.

The streets are elegantly designed with a European style, along with well-paved roads while the government buildings are a blend of modern architecture with Islamic arts.

Beautiful landscape of Putrajaya
One of the significant pink building: Putra Mosque
Breath-taking night view

Despite from the wonderful environment of Putrajaya, did you know that it is also a hidden paradise for foodies. Today we are going to bring you to the prosperous night market in Putrajaya. Tell us later how many of those food have you tried?

1.Satay

It is a Southeast Asian dish of seasoned, skewered, and grilled meat, served with a sauce. Mostly made of chicken and beef.

2. Apam Balik (Stuffed pancake)

Apam balik is sweet peanut pancake which is loved by people from South-East Asia. It can be prepared either in a thin and crispy variety or as a thick and soft pancake. Traditional fillings typically include a combination of ground or roughly chopped peanuts, sugar, and butter, but the modern varieties may include anything from corn, chocolate chips, and raisins to grated cheese or condensed milk.

3. Murtabak (Folded, stuffed pancake)

Crispy pastry tastes like roti canai, it covers the special prepared sauce. Murtabak is often described as spicy folded omelette pancake with bits of vegetables. It is the most common form of murtabak; which is egg-filled pancake, sometimes mixed with green onion and minced-meat, made from pan fried crepes which is folded and cut to squares. When you make your first bite, the aroma of sauce just spread in your mouth. You have to give a try!

4. Apam Beras Gebu (Fluffy Rice Cake)

If you didn’t see them in food court, you might think these are bath bombs. Actually these colorful balls are made of Rice flour. You can eat with coconut flakes as dessert.

5. Beef & Bone Marrow

The beef is boiled by all kinds of spices for hours. You have to try the essence of this dish which is bone marrow!

6. Keropok Lekor (Fish Sausage)

Fish sausage is a traditional Malay fish cracker snacks. It is originally from the state of Terengganu, Malaysia. It is made from fish and sago flour and seasoned with salt and sugar. It is slightly greyish in colour and gives off a fishy taste. This snack is eaten with special homemade chili blend. It comes in three main forms: lekor (long and chewy), losong (steamed) and keping (thin and crispy).

7. Nasi Goreng Ayam

Chicken fried rice is the safest choice when you don’t know what to eat. Every piece of rice is covered by the special aromatic sauce. With a bit of chilli, you just can’t stop eating.

8. Putu Bamboo

Steamed rice cakes in bamboo or putu bambu is a popular teatime delicacy in Malaysia and Indonesia. The cake is made of rice flour called suji and coloured green with extract acquired from pandan leaf, filled with palm sugar, and steamed in bamboo tubes, hence its name, and served with grated coconut.

9. Fried Spring Rolls

The name of “Spring Rolls” is actually a literal translation of the Chinese chūn juǎn. These are a large variety of filled, rolled appetizers in South Asian. Freshly deep-fried spring rolls are light, crispy and airy. The fillings of spring rolls can be various such as shrimps, papaya. It is all depends on the culture.  

10. Baked Tapioca Cakes

This is a Nyonya tea time treat. It is moist, tender, fragrant, and super delicious. There are also other types of traditional cakes which is made of coconut jam, kaya.

11. Tau foo fah

It is a Chinese snack made of tofu. The texture is tender like pudding. You can choose the topping whether is hot brown sugar, or hot lemon and ginger sugar. It is a very healthy snack that is full of protein.

12. Lemang (Coconut Sticky Rice)

Lemang is a Southeast Asia traditional food that made from glutinous rice, coconut milk and salt, it is cooked in a bamboo stick with banana leaves in order to prevent the rice from sticking to the bamboo. It can be served with spicy meat or any sauce theta you prefer.

13. Fried Banana

Fried bananas might be not that usual for western culture. But it is a very popular snack in Malaysia, Indonesian, Singapore and other surrounding countries. It can be served with coconut ice cream, or vanilla ice cream.

14. Putu Mayam (String Hopper)

Putu Mayam is a rice flour dessert served with palm sugar and coconut milk. The best vendors usually cycle around residential areas in makeshift mobile food stalls. This is one traditional South Indian dessert that has been “Malaysianised” and is best had with a spot of chai.

15. Fresh Mango juice

16. Milo

If you’re looking for a beloved chocolate malted beverage of Eurasia, there is Milo or Milo ice (on the right), also sweetened with condensed milk. You can see this scene very often in food courts, people are holding their drinks in plastic bags.

Check out the links to start your new experience:

https://byloka.com/trip/the-best-2-hours-tour-of-putrajaya-1st-ebike-tour-malaysia/13

https://byloka.com/trip/segway-tour-guided-eco-ride-at-putrajaya/82

Bylokan Local Food Stories; Ken’s Adventure in Kuala Lumpur

Food is not only something you eat, but it’s also something you discover, it’s something you crave for, and it’s something you would go through anything just to get it. For this article, we’re going to read about a rather rare type of dish but has such an amazing and scrumptious name to it.

Ken Hoh: When I travel, the one thing that reminds me of the place is food that I tried. I remember Johor from the Lontong, I remember Melaka from the Asam Pedas, and I remember Negeri Sembilan from Masak Lemak. But what about Kuala Lumpur? I mean, they don’t have any trademark dishes or foods, so how do I remember Kuala Lumpur well? Four words, Petaling Street, and Lala Soup.

In case you didn’t know, these tasteful treats are known as La La Clams.

Now when I go to Petaling Street, it’s like a compulsory for me to go to Lai Foong’s Coffee Shop, to get the finest and original La La Clam Noodles. It’s just a few minutes away walk from there, and you get to taste the most amazing soup you could ever imagine. The wait is around 10-30 minutes but on lunch hours it can go for as long as an hour. The place is just between Petaling Street and Central Market, you can’t get lost or confused as there are tonnes of people eating there all the time. The locals there are used to giving directions to get there so just ask the way.

The ever-legendary Lai Foong Coffee Shop

What makes La La Noodles here different? Well, first off, the taste itself. The fresh taste of the La La clams brings in the salty yet mushy sea taste, and they are considered the ‘chicken of the sea’. The soup itself has a bit of salty yet aromatic taste, with a tinge of spiciness for the feel of it. The preparations are also fresh and they only prepare the food when there are orders, on which it NEVER STOPS so they never stop preparing. You can definitely tell when they say they only choose the best and fresh ingredients when you take a sip of that amazing soup and noodles. For those who are looking for something different than your usual menu, then Lai Foong’s La La Clam Noodles should be one of the things on your list.

A sneak peak on how it’s prepared
Would you just look at that? wow.

Bylokan Local Food Stories; A Trip Down Memory Lane With Zikry

For this article, Byloka is focusing on telling the beautiful story of how one certain restaurant or food place in Malaysia can bring you memories that live for generations. This article tells about one Bylokan that has only one motto; Quality is key.

Raizzikry: In college, it’s a very common thing for you to want to eat somewhere that is cheap, at the same time somewhere that is really good. Now it’s easy to find the cheap ones, but the good ones? That used to be a rare find for me. Not Anymore. Have you ever heard of Nasi Manggey? It’s a rather local type of dish from the east side of Malaysia, which is Kelantan. Nasi Manggey consists of a bowl of rice that is steamed to perfection, a curry gravy that is handmade from the freshest of ingredients, some well-stewed vegetables, and small-cut chicken pieces that are fried to be crispy on the outside, but tender and well-done on the inside. Some people add on some Sambal Belacan which is some sort of spicy paste to add a little bit more flavour. What does it taste like? Heaven. The crispy yet tender chicken bites is to die for, which the flavours of the curry leaves and also the special mixture are to be responsible. The curry compliments the rice well as it has special spices used. The vegetables also give a good fresh taste to the dish for it’s healthy and crunchy sensation.

Would you just look at that? Amazing.

Now, where do you find the best Nasi Manggey? I found mine at Warung Kita Bandar Baru Bangi, a Kelantanese-based restaurant that serves a GENEROUS amount of chicken for their Nasi Manggey, at a VERY CHEAP PRICE for 4 Ringgit only. Imagine getting all of that chicken, rice, vegetables for less than 5 Ringgit, wow right? Now not only the price is really cheap, but the quality of the food is basically perfection. The way the chicken pieces are fried evenly and very crispy on the outside, not to forget the tenderness of the inside. Don’t even get me started on the` delicious curry gravy which, by the way, you can add on anytime at all, just ask the counter. Warung Kita also serves really good coconut shake to accompany the amazing taste of the Nasi Manggey, or if you’re looking for something lighter, they have freshly-poked coconut juice, poured into a silver mug to keep its chillness.

Warung Kita is located near German-Malaysian Institute or, Sungai Tangkas.

The main thing i remember why Warung Kita provides the best Nasi Manggey is because of their hospitality. Their warm welcome and also their friendliness are what adds up to such a bonus and in my opinion, should be what every restaurant provides. I may eat more rice dishes in the future, but Nasi Manggey will always have a special place in my heart.

Bylokan Local Food Stories; Adam’s Precious Dish

For this article, Byloka loves it when people tell about how one certain food can take them away back to a certain story, it gives the food a priceless sentimental value. One of our Bylokans is going to be telling his story about his favorite Malaysian food that has is a mixture of 2 or more foods, infused into one and tells a special story behind the delicacy.

Adam El-Muhammady: If you’re a pure Malaysian, and I’m not saying like the “woohoo I’m a Malaysian” but eats Nasi Kandar with a spoon and fork, I’m talking about real legit Malaysians that eats fried noodles with their HANDS! Anyway, if you’re a Malaysian, then it’s a very common thing for you to have Roti Canai for breakfast right? Some people even have something called Roti Banjir, which is where the Roti Canai is glazed and fountained over Dhal Curry and tinge of Fish Curry. Before we get started I’m going to explain basically what is Roti Canai. Roti Canai is an Indian-influenced flatbread dish found in several countries in Southeast Asia, including Malaysia. The dough is stretched and stretched until it becomes soft and is grilled over an intermediate fire until it becomes golden brown and crispy. sometimes some restaurants use the traditional charcoal stove for even burning, but nowadays people just use gas.

the ever-crispy Roti Canai. So good you get hungry by looking at it

Basically Roti Canai is like a full package because you have the bread, the beans from the dhal and also the curry. But have you ever imagined that one day, an innovation might occur? Well, it did Ladies and Gentleman, I’m talking about The Mansion Tea Stall, home of the Roti Canai Banjir Special.

do not be fooled by this slum-looking store, it has over more than 500 customers daily and on weekends hit more than 1000

Yes, located in the Center of Kuala Lumpur, the Mansion Tea Stall has been around since the 90s and has been a part of families for more than a decade, because it is THEN BEST FOOD IN TOWN. My dad himself went there with his friends during their teenage years. It used to be popular for being in the strategic place which is Jalan Masjid India.Now, it’s popular for their ‘kecik besar’ tea which is silky smooth, sweet at the right amount and flavourful, but I want to talk about their Roti Canai Banjir Special. Now, what makes their Roti Banjir so different from the rest? the answer is simple, Quality and Innovation. I’ll start with the Roti Canai. Their cook makes sure that the Roti Canai is golden brown before he stops cooking it, and once he does he gives the Roti Canai a clap so that the Roti Canai is cracked open while it’s still hot, giving it an extra crispy texture for when it cools down slowly. The Dhal Curry is thick, bursting of flavor and is pored at the right amount alongside the also well-cooked Sambal. Next, what I mean by innovation is when you see something original, but improved. What the Mansion Tea Stalls does it they add two half-boiled eggs to their Roti Banjir, making it a full meal for when you finish eating. Mixing all the gravy and eggs with the Roti, you get you full daily dose of protein, Carbs and also fiber. What more can you ask for?

will you just look at that beauty? amazing.

What makes this place more special is because of their warm welcome, where even though in a very full place, they never ever forget a customer or neglect anyone. My family and I have been going to The Mansion Tea Stall for as long as I can remember, and it’s safe to say that I will also introduce my friends and future family to this place for as long as they stand in Kuala Lumpur. This truly is a local story that many people and have come to love and I hope that The Mansion Tea Stall will become more recognized.

Bylokan Local Food Stories; Asyraf’s Delicacy Back Home

For this article, Byloka wants to focus on the beauty of Malaysian Cuisine. One of our Bylokans is going to be telling his story about his favourite Malaysian food that has been in our country for years and years and always focuses on the freshness and natural taste of each ingredient.

Muhammad Asyraf: My favorite local food would have to be the infamous Mee Udang. I have never tasted a more perfect combination than the Mee Udang. Beautiful- seasoned curry paste, mixed together with hand-stretched yellow noodles, accompanied by the zesty taste of the lime and some boiled eggs. Most importantly and not to be forgotten, the taste-burst of the Mee Udang, the prawns itself or known as ‘Udang’.

The perfect view of the Mee Udang

When we’re talking about where is the best place to get Mee Udang, I’m talking to the best place possible, which is at Yaakob Mee Udang Segar Pulau Sayak, Kedah. If you’ve ever been to Pulau Sayak, you will know that it is home to big, fresh and chunky prawns, and is a very perfect combination to the Mee Udang I was talking about. Just imagine, eating a bowl of fresh Mee Udang, each ingredient complimenting each taste, with each condiment complimenting additional taste, owh the savory!

While enjoying the scrumptious food, you can also enjoy the wonderful scenery

Every time my family and I go back to my hometown, which is in Kedah, it will be a compulsory necessity for us to go to Yaakob Mee Udang and have ourselves a bowl, sometimes two! It’s not only the generosity of the condiments that catches our eyes, but also the warm heart of the restaurant owners, Mr. Yaakob and his wife. It is surely a hidden gem that we’ve come to love.

Bylokan Local Food Stories; Amir’s family Relishment

The first thing you should know about Malaysians is they are passionate about food. Malaysia has inherited a vast array of cuisines from its melting pot of cultures. So a list of Malaysian food to try is bound to be unlike any other. When visiting Malaysia, do not attempt to take on Malaysian street food with impunity; you’ll be overwhelmed by the endless choices available to you. Visit any hawker center or noted food street, and you’ll encounter Malay specialties vying for attention among dishes concocted by other ethnic communities.

To get the full-on local feeling experience, we had the chance to ask a few locals, about what their favorite local food is and where it is the best place that we can get them.

Amir Akhiri: My favorite food would be the Ghee Tosai, the story goes a way back, when I was a kid I took Taekwondo classes every Sunday morning at 8 am, after class my parents usually brought the whole family to this one Indian restaurant called Lingam.

Here’s a visual representation of what a Ghee Thosai is

Lingam was so packed in the morning, as it is really famous among other Indians in Seremban for its Indian breakfast meals such as vadey, roti canai and other Indian dishes, but one thing they are really good cooking at is Ghee Tosai. Even with a great number of people, the people there are nice, communicative, and passionate about their food.

It is really famous among other Indians in Seremban for its Indian breakfast meals such as vadey, roti canai and other Indian dishes .

– Amir Akhiri
One of the main delicacies is also the Mee Goreng Mamak.

I still remember my first taste of Ghee Tosai, the warm and crunchiness on the edges was on point, and as you get to the middle, the cheese-like smell coming from the Tosai makes my stomach grumble as I took a soft bite from the center of the Tosai, it was, a really good Tosai. It was so good that our family still have our breakfast there usually on a Sunday even after 10 years! Ordering the same Tosai! We take it as a family bonding activity, also because parking is free on Sunday.

The classical sign of the Lingam restaurant is what catches ‘Instagram-worthy’ visitors

We went there for so long that even the aunty and chef remembers us as that one Malay family that always comes by on a Sunday for a good Indian breakfast. Whenever we come by they will always help us arrange the tables as we are a big family.

Melaka’s Golden Delicacy

Melaka is known as a haven for yummy local food and many people love going there during the holidays for a delicious food road trip. If you are familiar with Melaka, then you would know that one of the most famous food there is none other than their signature chicken rice balls that takes chicken rice to the next level. It’s basically taking the fragrant chicken rice you know and love then shaping the rice into cute little golf ball sizes. Of course, the meal isn’t complete with some tender yet firm chicken meat, and its tangy chili sauce. So, where did this local delicacy get its round shape from?

Malacca was said to be very busy 24/7. There was never a specific lunch time, or a time to each a hot plate of rice, or so they thought.

One of the stories starts with Hoe Kee, one of the most popular chicken rice ball shops in Melaka according to ‘Eating Asia’. The story begins from decades ago, a fisherman who was arrested when pursuing a catch in the Indonesian waters, so his wife had no choice but to be the breadwinner of the family and decided to sell Hainanese chicken rice at Melaka’s main jetty to the laborers working at the docks. she thought up and idea to sell her rice by rolling it into tennis-sized balls so that the workers could handle the rice easily and carry it around. Other theories come in that it was created by chefs so that workers can keep their food warm and not dry, while others also said it was for the ease of transportation.

Bylokan had the chance to try one very famous place for its Halal Chicken rice balls, which is the My Chicken Rice, located literally in the middle of Jonker Street. For us, the location is centrally located in the tourist spot, as it is in the middle of Jonker Street and it serves one of the best chicken rice balls we have ever had. We also had their bean sprouts and also their tauhu, which is what we would advise you to get alongside your delicious rice balls. The halal status of this shop is also certified so that Muslim Visitors will not have any hesitation. So, if you’re looking for a top-notch meal in Melaka, head over to My chicken Rice, and let your cravings be fulfilled.

the standard potion comes in 5 rice balls but you can always ask for more

However, there are always a few more choices of chicken rice balls outside from Malacca that you can try out :


-Ban Huat Heng Kopitiam, CG-5, Happy Mansion, Jalan 17/13, Section 17, PJ.

– Restoran Piau Hiong, , Jalan Gelugor, Klang.


-月萍豆芽雞(Air Itam Famous Bean Sprout Chicken) 66 & 68, Lebuh Kimberley, George Town, 10100 George Town, Pulau Pinang


-Brother Mong’s Chicken Rice Balls,
Skudai, Johor, Malaysia

Sri Lankan Cuisine

The Best Food in the world is in Malaysia, we surely would agree on this. But, have you ever tried to eat other foods exceptional from Malaysian’s dishes?

Well, perhaps you get tired of eating the same Malaysian Food? The same Nasi Lemak in the morning, or Char Kuew Teow during the lunch or the same Curry Chicken for dinner? Okay, that’s it. What about trying a new food dishes. Sounds good?

Coming from an island with a tropical climate, coconuts, fresh seafood, vegetables and spices. Fish is made into curries, BBQs or even dried out and coconut is used in almost everything from bread to salads, dressings and inside curries. So can you guess which country is this from?

Coconut, fresh seafood, vegetables and spices are the most influential components of Sri Lankan cuisine. Fish is made into curries, BBQs or even dried out and coconut is used in almost everything from bread to salads, dressings and inside curries. 

Rice with Broth
  • All Organic Pure Chicken 
  • Ginger, Garlic, Cloves, Cardigans, Onions, Curry Leaves, Mustard, Coconut Vinegar
Steam and Deep Fried Chicken
  • Chicken, Onion, Curry Leaves, Cayeenpepper, Onion
Steamed Potato
  • Deep fried, Onion, Chilli Flakes
Tomyum infuse Chicken
  • Chicken, Tomyum Flavour

Sri Lankan cuisine is a melting pot rich in flavours, spices and textures. The aromas made our noses tingle with happiness and the spicy flavours had us wanted to come back for more.

Well, in Sri Lanka and the plates are always so bright and colourful with a variety of different vegetables served around a centrepiece and the master of all Sri Lankan cuisine – rice. Trust us, there’s nothing better than a Sri Lanka home-cooked meal, especially by Sri Lankan himself. 

If you are interested to try this dishes, you can just book a tour with us. Our local host is super friendly and ready to fill your tummy with Sri Lankan’s food.